The Charter Blog

Good Data and Diverse Analysts: Necessities Within Education

Despite the many debates occurring within the education space, everyone can agree that students should come first. Within data work, putting students first means performing comprehensive, unbiased, and detailed analyses of data to understand how schools impact their students. Some of the most important factors to do this research include accessing the best data possible, making logical comparisons at the proper level, and having diverse data and research teams.

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Posted in Research

A First Look at Public School Leaders

The National Center for Education Statistics released a First Look at the data in 2015-16 National Teacher and Principals Survey (NTPS) and there are some interesting numbers in there. Because the tables break out principals in traditional public schools and principals in charter schools, they provide a chance to see where these leaders are similar and where they’re different.

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Posted in Research

New York City Charter Schools Lift Scores in Nearby Traditional Public Schools

A new publication released by Temple University analyzes the spillover effects of public charter schools in New York City neighborhoods. The report by Sarah Cordes, titled “In Pursuit of the Common Good: The Spillover Effects of Charter Schools on Public School Students in New York City,” finds evidence that the closer a public charter is to a traditional public school, the higher traditional public school students will score on Math and Language Arts assessments. Cordes is one of the first researchers to tackle how charter schools’ proximity affects academic performance of neighboring traditional public schools, with special consideration given to traditional and charter public schools located in the same building. Charter schools can benefit financially from co-locating with traditional public schools, as it can help alleviate certain facilities, maintenance, and upkeep costs. Cordes wanted to discover whether these blended-style buildings had a symbiotic relationship, or ultimately proved detrimental to students due to resource constraints.

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Posted in Research

The FERPA Fear Factor

Good researchers need good data. The National Alliance releases reports on charter school enrollment share and estimated charter school enrollment every year, and we depend on our state partners to collect and release necessary data so we can give appropriate policy recommendations.

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Posted in Research, FERPA

Charter Schools Can Help Renew America’s Cities

One thing is clear, today’s parents want, and expect, to choose their child’s public school. As this expectation has emerged and solidified in the last couple of decades with the availability of charter schools, a body of research has grown around the impact that a parent’s choice has on their student’s academic performance. Improving school outcomes for students is the obvious rationale for implementing education policy. However, policies can have unintended consequences and research is increasingly being done on the impact of parental choice in public education on communities.

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Posted in Research

Chicago Charter Schools Are Bridging the City’s College Divide

A college degree matters more than ever in today’s economy, and bridging the gap in college enrollment isn’t just an equity issue—it’s also an economic development issue. According to a recent report from Georgetown University, virtually all of the 11.6 million new jobs that have been created since the great recession have gone to workers with at least some college education and 72 percent of these jobs went to workers with at least a bachelor’s degree. Rapid economic change has also had a dramatic impact on the American workforce. For the first time, the report found that college graduates made up the largest portion of the workforce at 36 percent. Workers with at least some college education made up 34 percent of the workforce and those with a high school diploma or less made up just 30 percent. 

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Posted in Research, college prep, Chicago

Ohio Charter Schools Face Major Facilities Challenges

During the 2014-15 school year, the National Charter School Resource Center, the Colorado League of Charter Schools (the League), the Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools, and the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools collaborated to collect data and information about charter school facilities and facilities expenditures in the state of Ohio. A recently released report, An Analysis of the Charter School Facilities Landscape in Ohio, summarizes this important research. The data collection in Ohio was supported by the Charter School Facilities Initiative (CSFI), which is a national project developed by the League to research charter school facilities and facilities expenditures across the country.

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Posted in Research

Number of Students Attending Charter Schools Surpasses 3 Million

Each year, as the holidays end and school is back in session, the National Alliance determines the number of currently operating charter schools and estimates the number of students who attend them. Figuring out the number of schools is not that complicated. We simply ask each state for the names of any new charter public schools that opened this schoolyear and for the names of any that were open last year, but did not re-open in the fall. To estimate the number of students, we collect charter school enrollment data from any states that have already released numbers for the current school year, typically based on counts taken in October. And, for states that have not yet released data, we estimate the number of students in each currently operating charter school, on a school-by-school basis, either based on their own growth rates or, for new schools, on state-level average growth rates and average school size.

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Posted in Research

Nuevos Resultados de NAEP Muestran que Escuelas Charters Tienen Beneficio Para Estudiantes Hispanos

Han pasado seis años desde que el National Assessment for Educational Progress (NAEP) divulgó los resultados de su evaluación de ciencias delos estudiantes de 4to grado y de 12o grado y cuatro años para la evaluación de los estudiantes de 8o grado. Como la mayoría de las divulgaciones de NAEP, hay algunas buenas noticias y algunas malas.  Desde 2009, los estudiantes de 4to grado y 8o grado han visto un incremento en sus notas de cuatro puntos, mientras que para los estudiantes de 12o grado no se reportaron cambios. Las brechas de género han sido prácticamente eliminadas en términos generales, mientras las brechas entre negros y blancos, y entre hispanos y blancos se han reducido ligeramente a nivel de 4to grado.

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Posted in Research, NAEP, student achievement

New NAEP Science Scores Show Charters Work for Hispanic Students

It has been six years since the National Assessment for Educational Progress (NAEP) released scores on their Science assessment for 4th graders and 12th graders and 4 years for 8th graders. Like most NAEP releases, there is a little good news and a little bad news. Since 2009, 4th graders and 8th graders have seen their scores go up by about 4 points, while there was no change for 12th graders. Gender score gaps have been nearly eliminated across the board and the gaps between Blacks and Whites and Hispanics and Whites have declined slightly at the 4th grade. The most exciting finding for me - the results show that charter schools work for Hispanic students. 

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Posted in Research, NAEP, student achievement